Mrs. Geo. Clifford & twin boys, Clrance & Harry 15 yrs.
[By Glen Villa Jr., Last Revised July 31, 2011]

Mrs. Geo. Clifford & twin boys, Clrance & Harry 15 years are Lizzie Smith and her twin sons Clarence and Harry from a previous marriage. Lizzie Smith was born May 19, 1874 in Ione (1910 Census). Lizzie’s father was from Oleta and her mother was from Lockeford. In 1910, Lizzie had given birth to 4 children, 3 of which were still living.

Lizzie’s first marriage was to Frank Burris, an Indian from Oleta (Fiddletown). Lizzie and Frank had identical twin boys on August 1, 1900 named Clarence and Harry Burris. Clarence and Harry were born at Richey (Buena Vista, Amador County).

Lizzie’s second marriage was to Selim Clifford. Lizzie and Selim had a daughter, Mabel Clifford, together on May 1, 1904 near Ione. Selim was killed in an altercation at Sloughhouse, Sacramento County, on November 5, 1905.

After Selim died, Lizzie married George Clifford. The 1910 Census suggests this occurred in 1904 and the marriage to George was Lizzie’s third marriage. Considering Selim died in 1905, clearly Lizzie married George Clifford sometime after November 5, 1905.

In 1905-1906, CE Kelsey identifies George Clifford, wife and 3 children living in Union of Amador County without land. The wife of George Clifford at this time was Lizzie Clifford and the 3 children were Clarence Burris, Harry Burris and Mabel Clifford.

In 1910, Lizzie Clifford was residing with George Clifford in Township 2, Ione, of Amador County. Lizzie married George Clifford in 1904, which was the third marriage for both of them. George Clifford was 35 and Lizzie Clifford was 34 years old at the time. Lizzie Clifford was born in Ione, while her father was born in Oleta and her mother was born in Lockeford. Lizzie’s maternal grandparents were both born in Ione. Lizzie had given birth to 4 children, 3 of which were still living.

Between December 9, 1917 and December 13, 1917, Edward Gifford interviewed Lizzie Clifford. Edward Gifford collected ethnographic information from Lizzie and noted she was Northern Miwok at Buena Vista, Amador County. (see Gifford's Northern and Central Sierra Miwok Fieldnotes. 1917)

In 1930, Lizzie Clifford was living with her husband George in Township 2 of Amador County. George Clifford was a general laborer on a farm.

Lizzie was one of the female dancers during the ceremonial activities at the roundhouse of Charlie Maximo.

Lizzie Clifford died on March 6, 1955 and was buried in the Buena Vista Indian Cemetery.

According to family oral history, Lizzie Clifford had another husband before Frank Burris. She had a daughter with this man but the daughter died.

Articles Concerning Lizzie Clifford

Amador Dispatch
March 11, 1955
Buena Vista Lady Dies
The death of Lizzie Clifford, eighty year old resident of Buena Vista, occurred at the Amador County hospital on Sunday, March 6th, where she had been a patient for the last month.

Mrs. Clifford was born near Galt on May 18, 1874, and during the past sixty years had resided in this county.

She is survived by her husband, George; two children, Clarence Burris, and Mrs. Mabel Walloupe, both of Ione, and several grandchildren.

The remains were taken to the Clifford home at Buena Vista and there services were conducted on Tuesday, March 8th, at two o’clock in the afternoon. Interment occurred at the Indian cemetery at Buena Vista.

Clarence Burris

Clarence Burris was born on August 1, 1900 at Buena Vista, Amador County, to Lizzie Smith and Frank Burris. Clarence had an identical twin brother, Harry Burris.

In 1905-1906, Clarence Burris appears on the census conducted by C.E. Kelsey as one of the children living with George Clifford, wife and 3 children living in Union of Amador County without land.

In 1910, Clarence Burris was residing with George and Lizzie Clifford in Township 2, Ione, of Amador County. Clarence was born at Richey.

On September 12, 1918, Clarence Burris registered for the Draft. According to the selective service records, Clarence was born August 1, 1900. Clarence was employed as a farm laborer for the Mckissik Co in Ione. Clarence was described as tall, medium build, dark eyes and black hair.

By 1920, Clarence Burris married Birdie Miller, daughter of Henry and Queenie Miller. Birdie spoke the Fiddletown dialect of Northern Miwok and was an informant for the development of a Northern Miwok dictionary (Callaghan, Catherine A., Northern Sierra Miwok Dictionary, pg. 8). Clarence and Birdie had 3 children.

In 1922, 1926, and 1928, Clarence Burris was listed in the West Ione Precinct of the Index to Registration Affidavits Amador County. Clarence was employed as a laborer and was Democratic affiliation.

In 1930, Clarence Burris was listed in the West Ione Precinct of the Index to Registration Affidavits Amador County. Clarence was employed as a truck driver and was Democratic affiliation.

Accoriding to the 1930 Census, Clarence and Birdie Burris were residing in Township 2, Ione, of Amador County. Clarence and Birdie had 3 children living with them at the time. They had been married 10 years.

In 1932, Clarence Burris was listed in the West Ione Precinct of the Index to Registration Affidavits Amador County. Clarence was Democratic affiliation.

On November 1, 1933, Clarence’s daughters Grace and Ramona were attending the Union Grammar school in the Ione area.

On March 13, 1934, Clarence’s daughters Grace and Ramona were attending the Union Grammar school in the Ione area.

On September 30, 1934, Clarence’s daughter Grace and son Chester were attending the Union Grammar school.

In 1934, 1936, 1938, 1940, and 1942, Clarence Burris was listed in the West Ione Precinct of the Index to Registration Affidavits Amador County. Clarence was a truck driver and Democratic affiliation.

Clarence Burris attended the Jackson Valley School. Clarence quit school in the 4th grade to go to work. Clarence worked for the grant House, pumping water for the cattle. Clarence made 50 cents a day.

In 1964, Clarence Burris was one of three individuals selected to be in charge of the planning and constructing a round house at the Tuolumne Rancheria. Clarence Burris and his wife Birdie were also selected to be members of the Miwuk Acorn Festival Committee to be held annually in Tuolumne.

On January 6, 1965, the Catholic Diocese of Oakland gave the Ohlone Indian Burial Ground to the American Indian Historical Society. To commemorate the event, a new memorial was dedicated on April 3, 1965 and a eulogy in the Miwok language was given by Louis Oliver, Aza McCauley, John Porter, and Clarence Burris.

In 1965, The Miwuk Historians was established as a chapter of the American Indian Historical Society. Clarence Burris was one of five elected official historians for the Miwuk Historians.

Clarence Burris died in Jackson on October 31, 1984 and was buried in the Ione Public Cemetery.

Articles Concerning Clarence Burris

Amador Ledger
October 26, 1972
INDIAN ROUND HOUSE IN JACKSON VALLEY DESCRIBED FOR CO. HISTORICAL SOCIETY
The October 18th meeting of the Amador County Historical Society had many visitors.  Mrs. Pauline Ringer and Mrs. Nina Winter had invited Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Burris and William Franklin to tell the group the history of the Round House in Jackson Valley.

To hear the talk came 17 Miwok neighbors from the vicinity.  Other guests were K.R. Morgan, manager of the Sacramento State Parks:  George Linden, ranger at Chawse Indian Grinding Rock State Park; Cal Terhune, superintendent of Preston School, and Mr. and Mrs. Robert Scully, Ione.

In Clyde Berriman’s absence, Mrs. Winter acted as chairman.  The society learned that the Jackson Valley Round House was built in 1899 on the Burris property.  All that is left is a 5-foot pit, 40 feet in diameter, rock lined.  The former spring strawberry festivals and fall watermelon festivals have not been held since the mid-30’s.

A larger regional Round House dedicated to all Indian tribes is near Tuolumne City.  Miwok Round Houses are used to care for the sick in a ritual with a large fire and chanting.

Mr. Morgan told the group that plans are under way at Grinding Rock Park to build a 60-foot Round House to be used both by the Miwoks for ceremonials and the public.  The structure will be built in the traditional manner, by the older members of the tribe.  The roof will be covered with willow boughs and woven grass, after which it is sealed with mud to a two-foot thickness.

The Miwok visitors invited the Historical Society to attend next year’s acorn festival at Tuolumne Round House the second week in September.

At the November 15 meeting of the Historical Society at Noel Porter Hall of Trinity Episcopal Church at 7:30, visitors and members will hear accounts of early-day Sutter Creek.

Amador Dispatch
November 2, 1984
Obituary
Clarence Burris of Ione died Oct. 31, 1984 in Jackson at the age of 84. A native of Jackson Valley, he was a lifelong resident of the area. He was a member of Operating Engineers Local No. 3 of Stockton; Ione Free Methodist Church; and the Amador Tribal Council.

He is survived by his wife, Birdie Burris of Ione; two daughters, Ramona Dutschke of Ione and Grace Fitzgerald of Sacramento; one son, Chester Burris of Denver, Colo.; one sister, Mabel Walloupe of Ione; seven grandchildren; and 11 grandchildren.

Services will be held Saturday at 2 p.m., at Daneri Chapel with interment following at Ione Public Cemetery. Contributions may be made to the Alzheimer’s Disease Foundation.

NARA RG 75 Sacramento Area Office Coded Records 1910-1958
Code 054.1 Box #20
Sacramento Indian Agency Fiscal Year 1933
Burris Ramona, 10-27-1910, Miwok, Clarence & Birdie Burris, Amador Co
Burris Grace, 7-26-1925, Miwok, Clarence & Birdie Burris, Amador Co

Harry Burris

Harry Burris was born on August 1, 1900 at Buena Vista, Amador County, to Lizzie Smith and Frank Burris. Harry had an identical twin brother, Clarence Burris.

In 1905-1906, Harry Burris appears on the census conducted by C.E. Kelsey as one of the children living with George Clifford, wife and 3 children living in Union of Amador County without land.

In 1910, Harry Burris was residing with George and Lizzie Clifford in Township 2, Ione, of Amador County. Harry was born in Richey.

On September 12, 1918, Harry Burris registered for the Draft. According to the selective service records, Harry was born August 1, 1900. Harry was employed as a farm laborer for the Mckissik Co in Ione. Harry’s nearest relative was Lizzie Clifford in Ione. Harry was described as tall, medium build, dark eyes and dark hair.

By 1921, Harry Burris married Effie Walloupe, an Indian from the Mount Aukum and Omo Ranch areas. Effie and Harry had several children, the oldest child was born in 1921 and the last was born in 1927.

In 1926, Harry Burris was listed in the West Ione Precinct of the Index to Registration Affidavits Amador County. Harry was employed as a laborer and was Democratic affiliation.

Harry Burris and Effie Walloupe lived at Clarksona. They then moved to a house on the hill above the Grant House. There were two white houses on the hill above the Grant House between the Grant House and the Grant House Barn. Clarence lived in one house and Harry lived in the other. This is where Harry was living when he died.

Harry Burris died on May 13, 1928 and was buried in the Buena Vista Indian Cemetery. Harry played on the Ione Merchants baseball team. At the time of his death, Harry worked as a laborer for the “Grant” in Ione. Harry died from a hog running in front of his horse and being thrown from his horse. Family members claim he was moving the hogs for the manager of the “Grant” before the owners came and saw that he was raising hogs when they didn’t know it.

Articles Concerning Harry Burris

Ione Valley Echo
May 19, 1928
Harry Burris Fatally Injured
Saturday afternoon Harry Burris, who is riding for the H. Moffat Co., received a fractured skull by a horse falling with him. He was chasing some cattle when a hog ran in front of the rider and his horse struck it and fell, throwing Burris. Superintendant Clifton had him taken to Sacramento where he died Sunday morning.

Harry Burris was born and reared in Jackson Valley and was well liked by all who knew him. He was a member of the Ione Merchants baseball team who placed a beautiful floral wreath upon his grave as a token of their esteem. He leaves a wife and five children, brother and other relatives.

He was laid to rest Tuesday at Buena Vista, and his funeral was largely attended.