Albert Clifford and wife
[By Glen Villa Jr., Last Revised July 31, 2011]

Albert Clifford was born May 25, 1887 to Jim (Poker) and Maryanna.

In 1900, Albert or Cleveland Albert was residing with his brother-in-law Louis Alcalde in Township 2 of Amador County. Albert Clifford was 12 years old at the time, indicating a birth year of 1888.

In 1905-1906, CE Kelsey identifies Jim Clifford & Wife, 3 children living in the Union district of Amador County, which was located just North of Ione. Albert Clifford is one of the three children.

In 1910, Albert Clifford was a student at the Carson Indian School in Nevada.

In 1916, Albert Clifford was listed in the West Ione Precinct of the Supplement #1 Index to Registration Affidavits. 

On June 5, 1917, Albert Clifford registered for the Draft. According to the selective service records, Albert Clifford was born in Ione on August 25, 1889. Albert was employed as a laborer for the Ione Coal & Iron Co and was residing in Ione. Albert was described as married, medium height, medium build, black eyes and black hair. Albert claimed exemption from the draft due to his wife.

In 1918, Albert Clifford was listed in the West Ione Precinct of the Index to Registration Affidavits Amador County.

According to the 1928 Bia App Albert Clifford was born May 25, 1887. Albert was the son of Jim (Poker) and Maryanna. George Clifford was identified as a ½ brother.

Albert Clifford was one of the individuals who taught Bill Franklin about the Miwok songs and dances in the 1950’s.

Albert Clifford died on December 25, 1957 due to coronary heart disease and was buried in the Buena Vista Indian Cemetery.

Bernice Pate of Auburn had recordings of Albert Clifford singing handgame songs.

Articles Concerning Albert Clifford

Amador Dispatch
September 17, 1915
Criminal Returns
Township No. 2 – T. H. Gartlin, justice.  People vs Albert Clifford and Antonio Dominguez, fined $10, paid.  People vs Indian Alex, warrant issued and not yet returned.  No civil cases.

Amador Dispatch
August 10, 1956
Miwok Tribe Ceremonial Dance is Fair Feature
Among the unusual demonstrations to be seen at the Amador County Fair, August 24, 25 and 26th at Plymouth, will be Indian basket making.  Mrs. Marie Potts, of Sacramento, will demonstrate basket making of Miwok design and pattern using materials prepared in the authentic manner.  Mrs. Potts was formerly a resident of Amador County and is well known for her exhibitions of a nearly vanished art.  The demonstrations will be a part of the Miwok feature booth display which will be supervised by John Porter of Ione.

Miwok Indians will also be represented through ceremonial dances during the RCA Rodeo scheduled for the afternoon of Sunday, August 26th, and during the varity show.  “The book of Amador, Chapter 1”, the closing event of the fair.

Bill Franklin, formerly of Ione will present a group of Miwok dancers in these events, the first of such dances to be seen in Amador County in over 40 years.

Dancers in the troup are Bill Willa and Guy Wallace of Ione, Bill Franklin and Albert Clifford, formerly of Ione and now living in the vicinity of Sacramento; Maxine Brown, Romona, Marge, Clarice and Susie Franklin and Marie Potts of Sacramento.

Bertha Nye 

The wife of Albert Clifford in 1915 was Bertha Nye. Bertha Nye was born October 16, 1894 to James Nye and Pauline Rey. James Nye was the son of Mary Miller and brother or half brother to Henry and Frank Miller and Ida Chandler. Pauline Nye was the daughter of James Ambroise Rey and Emily Vittle, both from the Nashville area of El Dorado County.

According to the 1900 Census, Bertha Nye was residing with her parents James and Pauline Nye in Township 2, Ione, of Amador County. Bertha was 6 years old at the time, indicating a birth year of 1894.

In 1905-1906, CE Kelsey identifies James Nye or George & wife, 7 children living in the Rey District of El Dorado County. Bertha Nye is one of the 7 children.

In 1910, Bertha Nye was a student at the Carson Indian School in Nevada.

In 1918, Bertha M. Clifford was listed in the West Ione Precinct of the Index to Registration Affidavits Amador County. In 1920, Bertha was residing in Sacramento City with her husband Samuel Tripp.

When Bertha Nye applied for enrollment with the Bureau of Indian Affairs in 1928, Bertha Nye was 34 years old and was married to Samuel Tripp, an Indian from El Dorado County.

In 1930, Bertha was residing in Sacramento City with her husband Samuel Tripp. Bertha and Sam had 5 children and Bertha’s sister Florence living with them.

Bernice Villa learned one handgame song from James Nye or George Nye as she knew him.

Bertha Nye Tripp died in Sacramento County on October 23, 1972.